Review: Airbot Ori32 4-in-1 ESC

The Ori32 is the new 4-in-1 ESC from Airbot. I chose the Ori32 as my new 4-in-1 ESC, which will go into my iFlight iH3 build. It is a 4-in-1 ESC, which meanmeans that it replaces your normal ESCs mounted on the arms of the quad. Instead it places the EACs on a single board that can fit inside your frame.

Made a quick video about the Ori32 ESC, watch it below. Or, continue reading after the video.

Airbot Ori32 4-in-1 ESC

Size

The Ori32 is a 20 x 20mm mounted ESC with 3mm holes, but it is definitely not the smallest of ESCs. The Ori32 measures in at 28mm wide

by 40mm length, so it is by no means tiny.

The height of the Ori32 is 7.3mm and the circuit board is 2.5mm thick, giving plenty of space for some beefy copper connections for all of the power to run through.

The Airbot Ori32 weighs in at 12.1 grams, but it is worth all of its weight in performance.

The Ori32 is able to push out 25 amps of current, per motor, and can support 3 to 4S batteries. Although, I have read people running it on 5 and 6S without any issues. I am personally going to be running 4S batteries.

This ESC has plenty of filtering on board as well, as seen on the picture below.

The pads to solder to are nice and big, for a 20×20 board, so I shouldn’t have any issues with my poor soldering skills.

The Ori32 also has telemetry out, so you’ll be able to monitor your motor current draw from within Betaflight. The Telemetry wire, TX in the picture below, is part of the wiring harness that connects it to your FC. Please note that, if you buy it stand alone, instead of in the combo, the wires do not come with it. You will need to buy them separate. My goal was to buy the combo, from Banggood.com, but unfortunately they ran out of stock before I could order.

Initial Thoughts

As I mentioned before, the Airbot Ori32 is fairly large for a 20×20 4-in-1 ESC. I’ll have to see how it will install into the iH3 Frame. By first glance, it looks like it will fit in there long ways, but I will have to wait for the flight controller and the VTX to come in to dry fit it all in.

Also, if I mount the Ori32 long ways, it will place the XT30 pigtail at the back. This may interfere with the TPU antenna mount. Getting a little anxious to get all the parts to see how this all comes together.

Where Can you Get One?

Currently, the stock on the Ori32 is fairly low. Banggood.com was selling a combo kit, with the Airbot F4 Nano V6 and the Ori32, but that conbo sold out before I could grab one.

So, I ordered mine from GetFPV.com. Again, please note that you will need to buy the connector separately, which GetFPV does also carry.

The other location that has stock of the Ori32 is RaceDayQuads.com. I have bought plenty of things from them as well, they are a wonderful vendor. Only reason I chose GetFPV was because of a coupon I had that was expiring.

You can also pick one up from Amazon.com, but currently there are no options for Prime shipping.

Final Thoughts

I still definitely feel that I made the right choice picking up the Ori32. It’s big, but it’s also beefy. I shouldn’t have to worry about smoking my ESC, or under powering my motors with this thing.

We’ll have to wait and see whether I’ll be able to install it long ways, or if I’m going to have to resort to side ways. Keep reading my posts on the progress of this build. Happy flying!!

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